Carpet fitter found guilty of using a fake dry cleaning bill

Carpet fitter found guilty of using a fake dry cleaning bill

Further to our post in November where we posted the story of a man trying to claim fake dry cleaning bills from a number of licensed premises in Kent a man has been sentenced to 100 hours of unpaid work.

Daniel John Good, pleaded guilty to 12 counts of fraud by false representation at Sevenoaks Magistrates’ Court on Friday February 6th 2015. He was also ordered to pay £250 of compensation to the restaurants he targeted, as well as £85 court costs and a £60 victim surcharge.

The benefits of having your clothes dry cleaned

The benefits of having your clothes dry cleaned

Introduction:

Dry cleaning has proven to be the best method of garment cleaning over the past 100 years or so. But why should you pay that bit of extra money to get your clothes cleaned by a method made in the 20th century when you can turn on the washing machine and whip out the ironing board at home? Here are the benefits of having your clothes dry cleaned.

Cleaning benefits:

Dry cleaners use complex procedures and special stain removal chemicals to remove stains. Some dry cleaning establishments specialise in odour removal. Another one of the advantages associated with dry cleaning is the process’s ability to “deep clean” tough soils and stains. Dry cleaning has the ability to dissolve grease and oil in garments that is difficult to do with average washing. These dry cleaners use ozone generators to do an ozone treatment. Not only that, dry cleaning protects your clothes colour, brightness and softness as well as being gentler than other cleaning methods. Finally, surprisingly no water is used so it won’t run colours and shrink fabric.

The finish:

The finish of your clothes is one of the things you should most care about, dry cleaners should never let you down. Sure, maybe you have burnt your ironing or it didn’t turn out the way you wanted. Those average problems will disappear in an instant if you simply walk down the street and drop off your clothes to your trusted dry cleaner. With the special pressing equipment they can give your garments that crisp, wrinkle free appearance that simply cannot be beaten; If you have a loose button on your favourite shirt then don’t fret they can fix it!, saves you pricking your fingers attempting to sew. Before they return a garment to you, dry cleaners should conduct an inspection to make sure your order has met all expectations. If they spot even one problem, the item of clothing should be returned to receive further attention.

So there you have it, those are the benefits of having your clothes dry cleaned. So after reading this would you rather drop off your clothes and have a relaxing weekend rather than slaving away washing and ironing on a Saturday and Sunday?

Dry Cleaning Scam

Dry Cleaning Scam

Kent Police are warning local businesses in West Kent about a scam involving a man trying to claim fake dry cleaning bills.

He has been targeting licensed premises claiming that employees of theirs have spilled drinks over his partners clothes.

There have been reported incidents in Tunbridge Wells, Lamberhurst, Goudhurst and Matfield.

Bar staff are being asked to report any suspicious behaviour and remain vigilant against this person or persons.

The History of Dry Cleaning

The History of Dry Cleaning

Nowadays dry cleaning seems to be one of the most common things to do when one of our precious garments is dirty. The history of dry cleaning, however, dates back to the Mycenaean Civilisation (around 1600 B.C.), where ancient dry cleaners supposedly used absorbent earth and powdered meal to draw various kinds of dirt such as sweat, stains and odour from clothing. As time passed, liquid solvents gained the upper hand and the history of dry cleaning took its place.

Back in the day, people used to reach for chemical substitutes as cleaners (e.g. naphtha, benzene, even grated potatoes) instead of water-based ones, to prevent their garments from shrinkage and warpage. It is said that in 1825, a Frenchman named Jean-Baptiste Jolly made an innovative discovery when his maid accidentally spilled turpentine on a table cloth, which subsequently became cleaner. Jolly took his chance and rendered dry cleaning services to the public which he then called “nettoyage a sec” – a French equivalent to the term dry cleaning. Shortly afterwards, in 1857, dry cleaning had been introduced to the UK eventually. Despite the fact that Jolly was accredited with the discovery of dry cleaning, it has actually been recorded that turpentine had already been used for spot cleaning since 1720.

Step-by-step the chemical composition of solvents used for dry cleaning had been improved as pe­troleum-based ones were highly flammable and thus majorly dangerous (at some point, it even resulted in the government regulating dry cleaners). The initially used turpentine was soon replaced by white spirit and after World War I by chlorinated solvents as they had the chemical property of being less flammable and improved cleaning power. Eventually a solvent called perchloroethylene (also referred to as PERC) turned out to be the most effective but at the same time the most aggressive one. Unfortunately PERC is said to be carcinogen when being exposed to it at work or when ingest­ing it through contaminated drinking water. However, a solution for this problem was found in no time at all: Hydrocarbon. Hydrocarbon is a very popular solvent among dry cleaners as it is environmentally friendly and fully bio-degradable.

Ultimately there will always be newer, better and environmentally friendlier solvents for dry cleaning, as research is a never ending process which will always come up with improving solutions. That being said, it means that there will always be a way to keep our ever so precious garments clean.